20 FAQs About RMDs

After a one-year hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic, owners of qualified retirement plans and IRAs must adhere to the rules for required minimum distributions (RMDs). The RMD rules are tricky and could result in a substantial tax penalty if you’re not careful. For starters, an RMD is the amount you must withdraw from a qualified […]

Read more

Consider a New Approach to Meeting Your Business Real Estate Needs

Where your business is located, and how you use the commercial space that you have, can mean the difference between thriving and just limping along — or worse. That fact was brought home for many business owners during the COVID-19 pandemic, when lease payments became a big financial strain, and dust was accumulating on the desks […]

Read more

Received a Jury Notice? What Are Your Responsibilities?

If you receive a jury notice in the mail, you may wonder what it means for you. Can you be excused due to family responsibilities? Can you delay serving because of a big project at work? Will the case be criminal, civil, federal or state? Can you get fired for missing work? This article addresses these […]

Read more

Protect Your Invention by Applying for a Patent

Rights and Procedures In today’s complex world, every business owner should have a basic understanding of patents. Without this knowledge, you can’t protect your company’s inventions or defend yourself against lawsuits from other firms. U.S. patents date back to the Constitution, where it says Congress can secure “for limited times to … inventors the exclusive […]

Read more

Unlock Mortgage Interest Deductions for Home Improvements

Are you planning to take out a home equity loan or access a line of credit to make a significant home improvement? In the past, you could generally deduct the mortgage interest you incurred, within generous tax law limits. But the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) suspended the deduction for so-called “home equity debt” for […]

Read more

Would a Roth IRA Conversion Make Sense for You?

Roth IRA and 401(k) accounts were created in 1998. Contributions to Roth accounts are taxed on the front end at ordinary tax rates when made. But withdrawals from these accounts are generally tax-free on the back end. If you began saving for your retirement before 1998, even if you subsequently started contributing to a Roth account, you’ve probably accumulated […]

Read more

Guard Against Age-Bias Suits When Downsizing

While a bad economy may be one of the biggest reasons companies downsize, there are other reasons including mergers and acquisitions, changes in management, and outsourcing. Problems can arise, however, if laid-off employees believe they are victims of discrimination. Employees who have been with the company for a long time may feel they are victims […]

Read more

Identity Theft in the PPP Loan Program

According to a recent article in the New York Times, as much as 15% of the money allotted to the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) has been lost to fraud.  While the methodology used to determine this loss is suspect, we should assume that the amount lost to fraud from the program is staggering.  Often times, when massive […]

Read more

How Crooks Use Bankruptcy to Cheat Creditors

When a company goes bankrupt, honest owners or directors do everything they can to hold creditors’ losses to a minimum. When it becomes clear the business can’t be saved, they halt trading (in the case of public companies), hire professional advisors to help guide them through bankruptcy proceedings and generally arrange for orderly liquidation. Less […]

Read more

Following Up on Coronavirus-Related Distributions from IRAs

If you were adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, you may have taken a tax-favored coronavirus-related distribution (CVD) from a traditional IRA last year. This privilege was allowed under the CARES Act, which was signed into law on March 27, 2020. What steps can you take now to achieve the optimal federal income tax results? CVD […]

Read more

Interpreting the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act: An Analysis of the Supreme Court’s Recent Decision in Van Buren v. United States

The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986 (CFAA) subjects to criminal liability anyone who “intentionally accesses a computer without authorization or exceeds authorized access.” 18 U. S. C. §1030(a)(2). The term “exceeds authorized access” is defined to mean “to access a computer with authorization and to use such access to obtain or alter information […]

Read more

Improve Your Bottom Line with Better Inventory Management

In a competitive retail environment, there’s little margin for error. If your business exhausts its inventory of a key product when it’s most in demand, you’ll lose out on sales to competitors. And if you err in the other direction, you could be saddled with extra inventory and storage costs, potentially crushing your bottom line. It […]

Read more